Origami Peace Cranes for Franklin Regional High School

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By Calista Frederick-Jaskiewicz, Origami Salami and Folding for Good

10260011_795246393820863_8948436339295086195_nYesterday, just before the bell sounded for first class at Franklin Regional High School in Western Pennsylvania, a sophomore student went on a “slashing spree,” stabbing 21 fellow students and a security guard before being subdued. At least one student is reported in critical condition, and others have undergone surgeries.

Like other instances of random, senseless violence unleashed on unsuspecting students embarking on an ordinary day in school buildings, I am not at all sure that full explanations or true motives will ever be completely understood. I do know that, in the aftermath, a lot of healing needs to happen. We can help  by creating a tangible token of group concern.

We are folding origami peace cranes for the Franklin Regional FR graphic2High School Community. Our goal is to collect 1,000. Please feel free to write any message or wish on your crane. I’ll keep a list of everyone who participates, so be sure to identify yourself in any way that seems comfortable—full name, initials, age, hometown….whatever seems right to you. If you do not wish to identify yourself, that’s OK too.

Mailing, especially international mail, can become quite expensive. I suggest mailing the cranes folded flat then placed in an envelope. I can fluff them up and string them. If you want to string your own, the strand can still mail flat if you make a circle with it. If mailing is just too costly, then email a photo and I will post it to a photo gallery.

We Fold for Good all the time.

We teach STEM through origami, then we do good in the community with it. Today, the Franklin Regional High School community could use a little support. Even if you have folded hundreds of paper cranes, consider doing a few more. And if you have never folded one, this is a great time to learn.

Join us.

Campaign Ended.

Thanks everyone!

Final Count: 3,707 Cranes

Contact me directly at FoldingForGood@gmail.com

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Folding for Good: Art Meets Science @ the Carnegie Science Center

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Detailed Description of the Five Origami Window Panes at the Exhibit

The repetitious folding of cranes as a mental discipline in an effort to do good is as satisfying as it is productive. It is a physical representation of your hopes and wishes of support for the recipient. A profound act of kindness.

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Thousands of people joined together for our “Operation Sandy Hook” initiative through which I collected over 10,000 cranes and crane projects for the new Sandy Hook school.There are many individual and personal stories that come with our “Operation Sandy Hook” initiative, and with the donation of the over 10,000 origami cranes which were folded in 13 countries, then mailed to me in Pennsylvania. Every parcel was carefully packaged, so that no delicate crane or crane project arrived damaged or crumpled.

I am getting requests for more descriptive information about the exhibit design and plan, and I am happy to provide more details.

First of all, “Folding for Good: Art Meets Science” included a fun interactive component—I invited Carnegie Science visitors to Fold for Good with me and many dear teaching folding friends on Thursday, October 3, and Saturdays October 5, 12, and 19, 2013.  We greeted over 750 science center visitors at our post on the third floor in the beautiful Overlook Room. Many of the visitors were first time folders who left behind 234 origami cranes, which I strung into the cascade shown here. Other volunteers who taught the crane include members of the Japan America Society of Pennsylvania, Origami Club of the University of Pittsburgh, the Origami Club of Pittsburgh and Folding for Good leadership.

Only 5,050 cranes of the 10,000 cranes collected were included in the exhibit due to space limitations and safety concerns. In the background of the photos is the skyline of the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Five Window Panes of Origami Peace Cranes

Pane 1 AfricaPane 2 JapanPane 3

                      Window 1                                                  Window 2                                                 Window 3             

Window 1                      

Origami for Africa, Kyoko Kimura, Director, contributed the central cascade, which is comprised of 634 strung cranes with beads. These cranes are multicolored and folded from all types and sizes of paper. It is a colorful tapestry representation of peace.

Window 2

The central senbazuru in Window 2 was folded and strung by Janet Locke of Tochigi, Japan and sent as a gift to her sister, Julie Ash of Olympia, Washington, USA, to commemorate a family event. In turn, it was forwarded by Ms. Ash to us. These 1,000 cranes are perfectly matched and constitute a “senbazuru,” the traditional 1,ooo cranes folded for a single wish.

Window 3

Window 3 features another 1,000 cranes senbazuru folded by Owen Byrne, President Origami Salami Iota, Ridgewood, New York. Owen’s “1001 Crane Army” was received packaged by 100’s and then was strung for the exhibit with assistance from the Origami Club of the University of Pittsburgh.

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                        Window 4                                               Window 5                                                              Full Display

Window 4

The 1,000 red, silver, and blue metallic cranes centered in Window 4 were folded by Kimi Ego and family, Torrance, California, USA. All were received packaged and sorted by 100’s, and then were strung by me and a few friends.

Window 5

The central cascade of Window 5 represents the crane wishes of hundreds of participants worldwide. A few friends and I strung the center cascade from many sizes of paper and lots of patterns to create a tapestry of color that coordinated with Window 1 from Origami for Africa. The single, oversized crane that dangled from the cascade was folded by Sydney Perrine, President, Origami Salami Kappa and Folding for Good 10, Melbourne, Florida, and was the only window composed in this way. Sydney’s crane appeared to be flying over the “Point,” which is the spot in Pittsburgh marking the convergence of the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers to form the Ohio River. It is a lovely spot, and made for a striking background.

Set up

I strung all of the 10, ten foot long strands which flanked the centered cascades. It starts as a slow process, but as you get used to it, it is quite a bit of fun and very relaxing a mental exercise. I added facetted beads to the bottoms of all of the strands to catch the sunshine.

The facilities staff of the Science Center hung all of the crane senbazuru, cascades, and strands.

In closing, I am pleased to say that the touching messages written on so many cranes form the text of a photo essay in progress. Operation Sandy Hook became much more than an expression of sympathy at the happenings of the school murders there. It became a multicultural experience that gives everyone everywhere hope in the face of inexplicable tragedy.

Again, thanks everyone.

Tetris Cube

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This week, I constructed a Tetris cube, consisting of 7 shapes from 120 pieces of 6in by 6in origami paper. Here is a sequence of photos showing the cube itself, all 6 faces rotated. Then, there are photos of each individual piece. This makes a nice puzzle, and improves focus in both folding it, making the pieces fit into a cube, and putting it together again. You might notice some pieces of tape still in certain places. Once the paper is trained to stay in place, the pieces of tape will be removed. Original instructions can be found here. There are different ways to construct the components of this Tetris cube. This is the one I tried first.

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6 faces of the cube

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Taking apart the cube

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7 individual pieces

Folding for Good: Origami Tribute to Sandy Hook

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A Year Later… Wishes Handwritten on Thousands of Cranes… Operation Sandy Hook: Peace to You

On Friday, December 14, 2012, a gunman entered Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut and murdered 20 school children and six teachers and administrators.

We published an invitation to the folders of the world on our Facebook page to join together in folding origami peace cranes. Possibly even 1,000 of them. An Origami Salami Holiday event planned for December 15 in Denver by Seb Tabares became the first public event for “Operation Sandy Hook: Peace to You.” Over the next several months, our origami friends around the world responded with over 10,000 origami cranes and projects incorporating the iconic origami crane.

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Over the year, we have not ceased to think about the happenings of Sandy Hook, and pondered what this meant overall, and to our mission as well. Many of the cranes came from schools where leadership took the opportunity to build whole multi-disciplinary modules around learning how to fold the origami crane, and then do good with it, and also help students and parents overcome fear and anxieties about the daily routine of going to that place that is school.

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People designed original origami models and later published instructions; new origami clubs were begun in at least six schools; people from  Ireland, Germany, Australia, Japan, Hungary, the Philippines, Panama, England, India, Italy, England, Africa and the United States of America participated; many wrote prayers, thoughts, and wishes in their cranes.Families got together and learned the crane too, some folding hundreds. Others were folded by people overcoming their own more personal issues—one in hospital recovering from leukemia treatments, one passing on a family sanbazuru commemorating the passing of an infant family member. It wasn’t an inexpensive undertaking either. Pretty origami papers can cost! Many learners practiced on copy paper until the folding was just right; in fact, one future Origami Salami leader test folded over 100 cranes, but only sent in the best ones. Wordpress 7Mailing was the most expensive item, especially international shipments. Some international participants sent theirs to the United States in the suitcases of travelers; others sent photos and are still figuring how to afford the mail costs. Folders in one country petitioned local government to subsidize mail costs. I rented out a Post Office Box to receive it all. As I realized that my cell phone photos were not reproducible, I needed a photographer to assist with quality archiving too.

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The efforts of the thousands of people who participated made news from Galway, Ireland to Jonesboro, Tennessee. Crane projects figured into our “Liberty Treehouse” segment (an educational program on GBC-TV in the United States—our story is still in edit and queue); on KDKA-TV in Pittsburgh, PA; and at the 2013 Ohio Paper Folders Annual Convention in Columbus.

These treasures became the subject of an October 3-November 7, 2013 exhibit at the world class Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where folks believe in doing good with science too.

The leadership of Origami Salami and Folding for Good nearly doubled. And our able and talented leaders staged group events in their homes, clubs, and communities.

Great contacts have been made with officials in Sandy Hook Elementary. A new school will be constructed—the old one is being razed. Ours is a project of great hope, universal empathy, and solidarity. I think we will wait for that new school to conclude these efforts.

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Links to our photo archives are below, along with a listing of many of the organizations which participated and supported us. The many individuals persons are noted in or Facebook archive.

For more about Folding for Good’s “Operation Sandy Hook: Peace to You,” please visit our Facebook photo album archives:

Thank you to everyone who participated in this initiative, including:

  • About.com/origami by Dana Hinders
  • Albany High School,
  • Baden Academy
  • Beaver County STEM Advocacy Coalition
  • Breanna Kristian Photography and Design
  • Budapest Origami Club
  • Carnegie Science Center, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Centro para el Desarrollo Infantil Jerome Bruner
  • Claregalway Educate Together N.S., Claregalway, Ireland
  • Colorado Association for Gifted and Talented
  • Creek Elementary School, Muskogee, Oklahoma
  • Cub Scout Pack 327, Ridgewood, New York
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development
  • Debrecen Origami Club
  • EIC-TV Network
  • Fred Miller Photography
  • Girl Scout Troop 4102
  • Girl Scout Cadette Troop 4076
  • Grow a Generation
  • Grupo Origami Niteroi
  • HLN-TV : http://www.hlntv.com/article/2012/12/19/acts-kindness-sandy-hook-shooting
  • Homeschool Math by Hand
  • Japan America Society of Pennsylvania
  • KooDooZ
  • Lamar School Sixth Grade, Jonesborough, Tennessee
  • Magyar Origami Kor—Hungarian Origami Society
  • Math-Explosion, by Nick Johnson
  • Midland Elementary School
  • Ms. Feinberg’s Sixth Grade Class, State College
  • NAGC Britain
  • Neel Elementary School, Midland, PA
  • Ohio Paper Folders
  • Origami Club of Pittsburgh
  • Origami for Africa
  • Origami Italia
  • Origami Panama
  • Origami USA
  • Origami, Krigami Y PaperCraft(HN)
  • PA Cyber Charter School
  • Painting Paradise, Kauai, Hawaii
  • Pine-Richland Patch
  • Pittsburgh Today Live! KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Right Side of the Curve
  • Scoil Bhride, Shantalla, Galway, Ireland
  • Scoil Chaitriona Senior, Renmore, Galway, Ireland
  • Scoil Chaomain, Inis Oirr, Ireland
  • Scoil Chroi Iosa, Galway, Ireland
  • Seton Hall University, Office of Housing and Residence Life
  • Southampton Intermediate School, Southampton, New York
  • St. Mathias Elementary, Ridgewood, New York
  • Supporting Gifted Learners
  • The Helpful Art Teacher
  • United States-Japan Foundation
  • University of Pittsburgh Origami Club

If I have left any organizations out, please let me know. Individuals are too numerous to list here—but are listed in other archives. Thanks.

Cranes After the Rains; Sending Peace Cranes to the Philippines in the Wake of Typhoon Haiyan

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Cranes After the Rains

Support our friends in the Philippines!

Typhoon Haiyan has swept away entire villages in the Philippines and otherwise worked vast devastation there. As assistance pours in from world economic powers, we are backing the idea of Hendrix Martin “Marty” Almoite “The Origami Boy” to send over some peace cranes as a symbol of both support and hope. Marty leads one of our very active chapters in the Philippines, in and around Makati City. Consider placing your name and location somewhere on your crane, and send us a quick photo to post! Please mail yours, to:

Hendrix Martin “Marty the Origami Boy” Almoite
Operation: “Cranes after the Rains”
Origami Salami Mu and Folding for Good 12
Little Treasures Academy
53-E A. Mabini St. West Rembo, Makati City 1215
Philippines

Stay tuned for more information on http://www.OrigamiSalami.com and http://www.Facebook/OrigamiSalami1.

For more news about Typhoon Haiyan, go to HLN

Thank you for Folding for Good!

Celebrate World Origami Days with an Eye on the STEM in Origami

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9945_621463901199114_1296874833_nThe annual World Origami Days start today and run through November 11, 2013. People everywhere are invited to, “make origami as visible as possible, “and “spread the joy of paperfolding,” according to Origami USA   http://origamiusa.org/wod  which also features a free, downloadable, commemorative poster on its’ website.

How can we make the STEM in folding paper more visible during the 2 ½ weeks of the World Origami Days celebrations? Consider designing a library display, like the one pictured below, and place geometry and math books next to origami themed books and kits; include diagrams! Write an essay about origami and remember to mention the geometry and math implicit in every fold.

383168_346673032011537_1729370584_nMake a poster showing some science connections. One of my favorites is the origami waterbomb base—the origami balloon—which is the inspiration for the stent which blows up inside a vessel within the human body to  fit as needed and to compact itself to thread through tiny spaces to the necessary location. Fold flatability is valued in both origami and in biomedicine. Or volunteer to talk about origami in front of a group—-and take visuals with you; people connect with origami when they can hold it in their hands.

You can always go undercover with your STEM. Do some folding. It’s simple to carry a few sheets of paper and fold between classes, at breaktimes, or as an activity at a civic, school, or church group. It quickly dawns upon newcomers that we fold in angles, and can predict what the model will be from studying the crease pattern. People soon deduce that doing origami improves focus, memory, and spatial ability, which is considered an early predictor of talent in STEM. Many people will say that folding immediately has a calming effect on them.

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You can also plan to Do Good with your folding. Collect origami models to donate to a children’s hospital, rehabilitation facility, or nursing home. Paper models do not shatter, are small enough not to clutter, and collect little dust and grime. A few years ago, I made baskets of origami flowers for a rehabilitation floor my grandmom temporarily lived in after having a knee replacement. Many of the patients there fastened various kinds of origami flowers to walkers with pipecleaner “stems” which made for icebreaking conversation in therapy! Whether you are folding or admiring, origami relieves stress.

Origamis are brain teasers that can be reverse engineered, which productively entertains the mind. You can always make up some games using your origami models, like the one at left, to see whose frog jumps furthest. And models make good decorations too.

Happy World Origami Days. Here’s hoping that over the next few weeks, we all find some new way to Fold for Good and appreciate the STEM in origami.

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Library Displays Raise Awareness of the Science of Folding

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Zachary Ligh, President, Origami Salami Eta and Folding for Good 7, and his display at the Sugar Land Library showcasing his traditional origami and Yodas, Darth Papers, and Han Foldos! What a great way to celebrate World Origami Days!