STEM

DC Super Heroes Origami

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Origami artist Linda Stephen, Lincoln, Nebraska, recently shared several advance copies of  DC Super Heroes Origami written by origami master John Montroll with me and the Origami Salami and Folding for Good network. DC Super Heroes Origami, published by Capstone Young Readers, is due out in September 2015, and is showcased this week in New York City at Book Expo America.

I am giving one away through my Origami Salami Facebook community page, so you can enter to win one just for “liking” my Origami Salami Facebook page and sharing a photo album about the book to your Facebook page. The album is found here.

I  shared a few advance copies with Origami Salami leadership.

Here is a brief book review written by Mia Fantozzi, Origami Salami East Pittsburgh.

Mia Fantozzi, Origami Salami East Pittsburgh, practice folds the Tiara of Wonder Woman.
Mia Fantozzi, Origami Salami East Pittsburgh, practice folds the Tiara of Wonder Woman.

“John Montroll delivers an exciting and comprehensive guide to creating  DC Super Hero based origami. There is a wide spectrum of levels, including a section to help beginners learn basic origami folds. It’s easy and fun to use at any age.  One of the easiest pieces is Wonder Woman’s tiara, but other creations can be as challenging as making a dog that has four separate legs (and a cape!). I have found that these challenging pieces are the most fun and by no means impossible, though they do require a bit more work. The book specifically features Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, and the Justice League – as well as villains, important symbols, and accessories. There are pull out pages at the back so the things you fold can have intricate colored patterns (such as a face). This book is excellent for origami and comic book fans alike!”

Calista Frederick-Jaskiewicz shows off an advance copy of "DC Super Heroes Origami" by John Montroll.
Calista Frederick-Jaskiewicz shows off an advance copy of “DC Super Heroes Origami” by John Montroll.

As for me, John Montroll authored one of my favorite origami books, Animal Adventure Origami,  and I mentioned it in an interview with Dana Hinders of About.com/origami several years ago. Like earlier books, his instructions in DC Super Heroes Origami are easy to follow and fun to produce. DC Super Heroes Origami is a thick, colorful, engaging book. It contains 96 custom sheets of paper. Each sheet has an orientation arrow so that you’ll know exactly how to start—pay attention to the Paper User Guide. I suggest practicing on other, plain paper before using the published designs.

This is DC Comics origami, math you can hold in your hand, and a lot of fun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ben’s Origami Interview

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Here is a guest post from Ben Labuzzetta, who leads Origami Salami Wisconsin, Coulée Region. Ben has devised projects which engage others to Fold for Good, but he also enjoys a particular interest in the mathematical implications of origami. He discusses the development of those interests in question/answer format in his entry below.
Thanks Ben!

Read the rest of this entry »

3,700 Paper Cranes Set for Delivery to Franklin Regional High School on Wednesday, June 4, 2014

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Folding for Good for Franklin Regional*: Keep on going, people care!

photo-8On Wednesday, June 4, 2012, I will present Franklin Regional High School Principal Ronald Suvak and his staff with around 3,700 strung paper cranes in support of the school community which was rocked on April 9 when a sophomore student went on a “stabbing and slashing spree” injuring 20 students and a security guard.

Folding for Good for Franklin Regional is our initiative to join with other paper folders to create 1,000 paper cranes for Franklin Regional. Japanese tradition suggests that the folding of 1,000 origami cranes grants the recipient a wish. Folding for Good for Franklin Regional netted 3,700 origami cranes from folders in Ireland, Germany, and eight of the United States—more than triple what we had hoped for.

On April 11, in launching this initiative, I wrote, “Like other instances of random, senseless violence unleashed on unsuspecting students embarking on an ordinary day in school buildings, I am not at all sure that full explanations or true motives will ever be completely understood. I do know that, in the aftermath, a lot of healing needs to happen. We can help by creating a tangible token of group concern. We are folding origami peace cranes for the Franklin Regional High School Community.”

Thanks to everyone who supported this initiative. Each crane was donated and the folders themselves footed the cost of postage to Pittsburgh. Student organizers put up tables in school cafeterias, libraries, GATE classrooms, and Girl Scout meetings. Other students hosted “fold-ins” at their homes. The Pitt Origami Club folded cranes at their last meeting of Spring term during finals week. photo-9Individuals created original centerpieces and Franklin Regional Panther logo cranes. One complete, matched senbazuru strung with faith, hope and love beads was created by a single person.

Around 2,100 of the cranes came in “loose.” I ironed, fluffed, sorted and strung all; some are grouped into themes of sorts: there’s a “doodle strand,” strands in Franklin Regional school colors, matching pair strands of big and little cranes, the message strand, floral strands, and plenty of colorful rainbow strands. I ordered some custom stickers for the tails of the many completed strands.

Some people wrote wishes on the wings of their cranes. Here are a few sentiments from student folders:

  • Stay Strong;
  • Remember, for every one thing bad, 2 good things will come;
  • Talking with quiet confidence beats screaming with insecurity;
  • Have faith, things will get better;
  • It’s not what we are that makes the world, it’s what we aren’t;
  • The love in the world is always more powerful than the hate;
  • Be the change you want to see in the world; and
  • Keep on going, people care.

I also kept a scrapbook of every note sent in along with a list of everyone who participated for our friends at FR. See, www.facebook.com/notes/origami-salami/folding-for-good-for-franklin-regional/787650054580497

Each faculty member will receive a specially strung crane or crane pair with a note explaining this initiative, and there will be around 22 extras in case those who were injured would like one.

And so will end the eventful school year at Franklin Regional Senior High School.

Thank you all. We have done something good.

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photo-6*Folding for Good for Franklin Regional is coordinated by Calista Frederick-Jaskiewicz, Founder & CEO ofOrigami Salami and Folding for Good, which currently comprises 16 chapters on four continents. Origami Salami is a student movement mobilizing people as advocates for STEAM studies through the fun of origami; Folding for Good is an initiative to engineer creative ways to Do Good with it.

He Does It Again! Owen Byrne, Origami Salami Ridgewood(Queens) New York City, folds 1,000 Origami Cranes, for Folding for Good!

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When the call goes out to Fold for Good, Owen Byrne, President, Origami Salami Queens, New York City, answers big. He folded 1,000 for Operation Sandy Hook and answered with an encore for, “Folding for Good for Franklin Regional.” This time, he also strung his army of 1,000 and accented with a top ring of silver beads reading, “Peace; Hope; Love.” There is a white leader crane crowning the top. Do one good deed a day….or maybe a thousand when you make the time for it.

Here are Owen’s thoughts about Folding for Good for Franklin Regional.

Calista, 

Since I’m a firm believer in doing one good deed a day for others, it was an easy decision for me to participate in the Franklin Regional High School OS Project.

It took me two weeks and all of my free time, which I don’t have a lot of: between homework, research projects, saxophone and piano practice for concerts, scouting and few more activities, I had to stay up late quite a few nights to fold cranes. photo 3

Folding the 1000 cranes for FRHS meant a lot to me. I know that I can’t prevent violence in schools, but what I can do is to promote peace – that is what I want to achieve by making these peace cranes ‘armies’ for those schools which experience such sadness.

At first, my plan was to just make simple Senbazuru, but when I was at the craft store to get plain beads and string for it, I found beads with peace, hope, love words on them, and at that moment I knew I had to include them in my Senbazuru.

For me, peace in my design stands for: all kids deserve to grow up in a peaceful and happy environment. Schools should be a safe place for all.

Love stands for: show respect towards one other and be nice to the people around you.

Hope stands for: no more violence in schools. Hope that somebody will notice troubled kids and help them before they use violence as a way to be seen or heard.

As I was folding the cranes, I was thinking about the life story of Sadako Sasaki and her words: “I will write peace on your wings and you will fly all over the world.”

Peace to You,

Owen

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Origami Salami Manhattan stages fold-a-thon; Dalton School students contribute 231 cranes to “Folding for Good for Franklin Regional.”

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By Calista Frederick-Jaskiewicz, Founder and CEO, Origami Salami and Folding for Good

Dalton fold in 5Groups of students at the Dalton School, Manhattan, pulled together to contribute 231 origami cranes to our initiative, “Folding for Good for Franklin Regional.” A friendly fold-a-thon hosted by Origami Salami President Dylan Lee netted 161 cranes—not only did the kids fold and have a great time, but they also listened to pop music and sang Frozen’s “Let it Go” at some point! The Asian Culture Club contributed another 70 cranes to cap off the effort at 231 cranes.

Extra thanks to Roxanne Hsu Feldman, Dalton School faculty; Aaron Erlanger, Atticus Lee, Auggie Bhavsar, Nathaniel Ting, Nikolas Ramirez, William Nam, and Leo Small; and to Dylan’s awesome Mom, Emmie Lee.

Special touch: cranes personalized with initials and “NYC.” 

Thank you Dylan and Team Origami Salami Manhattan!

Folding for Good: Art Meets Science @ the Carnegie Science Center

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Detailed Description of the Five Origami Window Panes at the Exhibit

The repetitious folding of cranes as a mental discipline in an effort to do good is as satisfying as it is productive. It is a physical representation of your hopes and wishes of support for the recipient. A profound act of kindness.

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Thousands of people joined together for our “Operation Sandy Hook” initiative through which I collected over 10,000 cranes and crane projects for the new Sandy Hook school.There are many individual and personal stories that come with our “Operation Sandy Hook” initiative, and with the donation of the over 10,000 origami cranes which were folded in 13 countries, then mailed to me in Pennsylvania. Every parcel was carefully packaged, so that no delicate crane or crane project arrived damaged or crumpled.

I am getting requests for more descriptive information about the exhibit design and plan, and I am happy to provide more details.

First of all, “Folding for Good: Art Meets Science” included a fun interactive component—I invited Carnegie Science visitors to Fold for Good with me and many dear teaching folding friends on Thursday, October 3, and Saturdays October 5, 12, and 19, 2013.  We greeted over 750 science center visitors at our post on the third floor in the beautiful Overlook Room. Many of the visitors were first time folders who left behind 234 origami cranes, which I strung into the cascade shown here. Other volunteers who taught the crane include members of the Japan America Society of Pennsylvania, Origami Club of the University of Pittsburgh, the Origami Club of Pittsburgh and Folding for Good leadership.

Only 5,050 cranes of the 10,000 cranes collected were included in the exhibit due to space limitations and safety concerns. In the background of the photos is the skyline of the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Five Window Panes of Origami Peace Cranes

Pane 1 AfricaPane 2 JapanPane 3

                      Window 1                                                  Window 2                                                 Window 3             

Window 1                      

Origami for Africa, Kyoko Kimura, Director, contributed the central cascade, which is comprised of 634 strung cranes with beads. These cranes are multicolored and folded from all types and sizes of paper. It is a colorful tapestry representation of peace.

Window 2

The central senbazuru in Window 2 was folded and strung by Janet Locke of Tochigi, Japan and sent as a gift to her sister, Julie Ash of Olympia, Washington, USA, to commemorate a family event. In turn, it was forwarded by Ms. Ash to us. These 1,000 cranes are perfectly matched and constitute a “senbazuru,” the traditional 1,ooo cranes folded for a single wish.

Window 3

Window 3 features another 1,000 cranes senbazuru folded by Owen Byrne, President Origami Salami Iota, Ridgewood, New York. Owen’s “1001 Crane Army” was received packaged by 100’s and then was strung for the exhibit with assistance from the Origami Club of the University of Pittsburgh.

Pane 4 USA red white blue FoldingForGood_CSCExhibit-0481photo (42)

                        Window 4                                               Window 5                                                              Full Display

Window 4

The 1,000 red, silver, and blue metallic cranes centered in Window 4 were folded by Kimi Ego and family, Torrance, California, USA. All were received packaged and sorted by 100’s, and then were strung by me and a few friends.

Window 5

The central cascade of Window 5 represents the crane wishes of hundreds of participants worldwide. A few friends and I strung the center cascade from many sizes of paper and lots of patterns to create a tapestry of color that coordinated with Window 1 from Origami for Africa. The single, oversized crane that dangled from the cascade was folded by Sydney Perrine, President, Origami Salami Kappa and Folding for Good 10, Melbourne, Florida, and was the only window composed in this way. Sydney’s crane appeared to be flying over the “Point,” which is the spot in Pittsburgh marking the convergence of the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers to form the Ohio River. It is a lovely spot, and made for a striking background.

Set up

I strung all of the 10, ten foot long strands which flanked the centered cascades. It starts as a slow process, but as you get used to it, it is quite a bit of fun and very relaxing a mental exercise. I added facetted beads to the bottoms of all of the strands to catch the sunshine.

The facilities staff of the Science Center hung all of the crane senbazuru, cascades, and strands.

In closing, I am pleased to say that the touching messages written on so many cranes form the text of a photo essay in progress. Operation Sandy Hook became much more than an expression of sympathy at the happenings of the school murders there. It became a multicultural experience that gives everyone everywhere hope in the face of inexplicable tragedy.

Again, thanks everyone.

Tetris Cube

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This week, I constructed a Tetris cube, consisting of 7 shapes from 120 pieces of 6in by 6in origami paper. Here is a sequence of photos showing the cube itself, all 6 faces rotated. Then, there are photos of each individual piece. This makes a nice puzzle, and improves focus in both folding it, making the pieces fit into a cube, and putting it together again. You might notice some pieces of tape still in certain places. Once the paper is trained to stay in place, the pieces of tape will be removed. Original instructions can be found here. There are different ways to construct the components of this Tetris cube. This is the one I tried first.

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6 faces of the cube

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Taking apart the cube

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7 individual pieces